Trang Dinh's Portfolio
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My Loving Nanny

 
 

MY LOVING NANNY (MLN)

Website Redesign

I worked in a team of five classmates as a co-project manager, client liaison, and co-designer for this project. The purpose of this project was to improve the online presence of a business by redesigning their website to meet business and user goals. This project was part of the Human Centered Design & Engineering (HCDE) graduate curriculum at the University of Washington.

 
 
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ABOUT MLN

My Loving Nanny is a web-based business that seeks to match parents with nannies who are screened and managed by the business. It was bought by Anthony and Rebekah Rivisto in 2014 and has since expanded to Portland, Spokane, and Vancouver. The couple both come from business backgrounds and have had experience working with children. After becoming parents, they knew that My Loving Nanny was their perfect opportunity to become business owners while pursuing their passion to make an impact in their community.

 
 
 
 

OUR PROCESS

1.  Analyze current experience
2. Create user personas using website data
3. Redesign user flow and information architecture
4. Conduct user testing with wireframes
5. Design prototype

 
 
 
 

CURRENT EXPERIENCe

We observed a few parents using the website and realized that the information architecture was not intuitive. Information about nanny requirements and  the screening process was found under 'Parents' when parents thought it would be under 'Nannies.'

In addition, call-to-action buttons were repeated three times on a single page, but their labels confused parents. What is the difference between "Register now" and "Book Care now?" Are both necessary?

Finally, parents expressed their thoughts on the website's trustworthiness. One parent said reading reviews builds a lot of his trust for a business, especially when he's giving them his children. While there is a "Write a Review' link and a 'Client Testimonials' section, he wasn't able to click on it and read more.   

 
 
Mapping out current experience, identifying pain points. 

Mapping out current experience, identifying pain points. 

 
 
 
 

USER PERSONAS

We've identified three audiences of the MLN website:
1. Parents looking to hire a nanny
2. Nannies looking to apply
3. Potential business partners who are interested in opening a MLN

These personas derived from interviews with parents and the client, and website data provided by the client. 

 
 
 
 
 
 

INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE

Taking key terms and phrases from the website, we used Optimal Workshop to host a card sorting activity with 5-7 participants. This helped give insight into users' mental model when navigating through the website. 
 

 
 
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WIREFRAMES & TESTING

Keeping key brand features from the original MLN website, we designed a few wireframes to highlight a more intuitive navigation system as well as surfacing reviews and awards to the front page to help build trust in new parent users. 

We tested the wireframes with 5 participants and found areas of improvement in our prototype. For example, it is still unclear if the "Nannies" tab contains information about nannies or for nannies. Also, the teddy bear awards at the bottom has no context around them and therefore adds little value to the page. 
 

 
 
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PROTOTYPE

When re-designing the website, we didn't want to create an entire new brand for MLN. Instead, we enhanced it by keeping core features such as the serif font and the warm pastel purple color to bring forth the welcoming and trustworthy tone of MLN. 

Before

 
 
 
 

 

After

 
 
 
 
 
 

IMPACT

Our client was extremely pleased and emotional upon seeing our redesign. In addition to the redesign, we made recommendations such as an area for parents to read nannies' bios and specialty. This feature was desired by all participants in our testing, and if implemented, would help My Loving Nanny be more transparent and trustworthy to parents. 

 
 
 
 

reflection

In this project, I realized how important content strategy and copy text is. Although we created a more intuitive information architecture for parents and nannies to use, it was still confusing in our usability testing. Our navigation tabs were still labeled 'Parents' and 'Nannies,' but by changing them to 'For Parents,' and 'For Nannies,' participants said it was much easier to understand.